Mother Teresa and Sainthood

mother_theresa
From  Friday Church News Notes, September 9, 2016 wayoflife.org,

From SAINT MOTHER TERESA  – The late Mother Teresa was pronounced a Catholic saint on Sunday, September 4, by Pope Francis. Sainthood requires the documentation of two miracles attributed to the deceased individual. The first, in 1998, the year after her death, was the cure of a stomach tumor in an Indian woman. Though the bishop declared this a miracle performed by the dead nun, the woman’s husband said he believed that medicine had cured his wife. The second case, in 2008, was the “inexplicable” recovery of a Brazilian man who woke from a coma after his wife prayed to the nun. By her own admission, Mother Teresa found only darkness in her spiritual life and practice. This is documented in the shocking book Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light, the Private Writings of the Saint of Calcutta (2007), which contains statements made by the nun to her confessors and superiors over a period of more than 65 years. In March 1953, she wrote to her confessor: “THERE IS SUCH TERRIBLE DARKNESS WITHIN ME, as if everything was dead. It has been like this more or less from the time I started ‘the work.’” In 1979 she wrote: “THE SILENCE AND THE EMPTINESS IS SO GREAT–that I look and do not see,–Listen and do not hear.” Her private statements about the spiritual darkness she encountered in contemplative prayer continued in this vein until her death, and they are the loudest possible warning about the danger of the Catholic contemplative SAINT MOTHER TERESA  – The late Mother Teresa was pronounced a Catholic saint on Sunday, September 4, by Pope Francis. Sainthood requires the documentation of two miracles attributed to the deceased individual. The first, in 1998, the year after her death, was the cure of a stomach tumor in an Indian woman. Though the bishop declared this a miracle performed by the dead nun, the woman’s husband said he believed that medicine had cured his wife. The second case, in 2008, was the “inexplicable” recovery of a Brazilian man who woke from a coma after his wife prayed to the nun. By her own admission, Mother Teresa found only darkness in her spiritual life and practice. This is documented in the shocking book Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light, the Private Writings of the Saint of Calcutta (2007), which contains statements made by the nun to her confessors and superiors over a period of more than 65 years. In March 1953, she wrote to her confessor: “THERE IS SUCH TERRIBLE DARKNESS WITHIN ME, as if everything was dead. It has been like this more or less from the time I started ‘the work.’” In 1979 she wrote: “THE SILENCE AND THE EMPTINESS IS SO GREAT–that I look and do not see,–Listen and do not hear.” Her private statements about the spiritual darkness she encountered in contemplative prayer continued in this vein until her death, and they are the loudest possible warning about the danger of the Catholic contemplative mysticism which is sweeping through evangelicalism. Contemplative practices, such as the Jesus Prayer, breath prayers, visualizing prayer, centering prayer, and lectio divina are exceedingly dangerous. They are vehicles to bring practitioners into contact with demons. Many who engage in these things end up believing in a pagan concept of God such as pantheism (God is everything) and panentheism (God is in everything). Practitioners typically become increasingly ecumenical and interfaith in thinking. See Evangelicals and Contemplative Prayer, available in print and free eBook editions from http://www.wayoflife.org. For a much more extensive look at this subject see Contemplative Mysticism: A Powerful Ecumenical Bond.

A TRUE SAINT (Friday Church News Notes, September 9, 2016, www.wayoflife.org) – The Roman Catholic doctrine of sainthood proves its heretical character. Nowhere do we find Christians in the New Testament churches praying to saints. The Bible instructs us to pray to God the Father through Jesus Christ, the one Mediator between God and men (1 Tim. 2:5). To pray to a mere man or woman is blasphemy. In the New Testament the term “saint” is applied to all born again Christians, not to a special class of deceased Christians. See Acts 9:13, 32, 41; 26:10; Rom. 8:27; 12:13; 15:25, 31; 16:2, 15; 1 Cor. 6:1, 2; 14:33; 16:1, 15; 2 Cor. 8:4; 9:1, 12; 13:13; Eph. 1:1; Phil. 1:1; Col. 1:2, 4; Phile. 7; Heb. 6:10; 13:24. Even the carnal Christians at Corinth are called saints (2 Cor. 1:1). Born again Christians are not saints because they are especially holy; they are saints because they have a sinless Saviour and He has removed their sin before God (Rev. 1:5, 6; 1 Pet. 2:9, 10). In the sight of God, through Jesus Christ, the believer is “holy and unblameable and unreproveable” (Col. 1:22). This is why we can be called saints. Praise His holy name!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s